The life raft test: The importance of diverse working styles

ad5ewh_lo.pngWhen you have the opportunity to add a new member to your team, there are lots of ways to go about making your selection. Beyond screening for the proper experience and skills, many selection methods involve some element of testing for fit. Is their working style the right one for the role? Is their personality a fit for the culture? Or, employing the infamous airport test, would you enjoy yourself if you were stuck in an airport together?

Next time you’re selecting a new team member, imagine you’re not stuck in the airport. But the plane makes a crash landing at sea and you’re now floating in a life raft with no hope of immediate rescue. Would you want everyone on that raft to have the same strengths and weaknesses?

Read the entire perspective from Suzanne Vickberg, Business Chemistry’s Chief Researcher, in HR People + Strategy’s Blog.

What’s your leadership B side?

121247890_loSome of you will remember the days when listening to music didn’t mean streaming it on your phone but instead putting on a record. And if that record was a 45, after listening to the hit song on the A side, you had to flip that little black disc over to hear the other song (the B side). The A side was why you bought the record but you got the B side song too whether you wanted it or not. As a leader, you too have an A and a B side.

Learn how a leader’s contributions can set them apart during their career in this article co-written by Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg.

 

October 5 webcast announced: Demystifying the millennial mindset

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Register today for our next webcast.  The generation that received its first high school diplomas in 2000 now includes many experienced professionals. Their reputation preceded them into the workforce: Entitled, self-centered. What is the reality? Based on the Deloitte Business Chemistry framework and three original research studies, we’ll discuss:

  • Why millennials are more likely than baby boomers or GenXers to be change-averse as Business Chemistry Guardians
  • The unique stresses this generation brings to, and finds within, professional life
  • The reason they may be “secret introverts” despite their hyper-networked communication habits

Click here to view the report: “The Millennial Mindset: Work styles and aspirations of millennials.”

Think you know millennials? Think again says new Business Chemistry report

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Download the new report and register today for the upcoming webcast on October 5.

Never mind how old millennials are. The idea of them is 30 years old. It was 1987 when William Strauss and Neil Howe hung that name on the people who would start to graduate from high school at the turn of the coming century.

And ever since, we’ve often heard the same stereotypes: They’re self-centered. Entitled. They value passion over performance. Fulfillment over a full day’s work. And they don’t understand why no one has given them a corner office yet. Now that millennials are deep into the workforce, how well do these stereotypes really hold up?

Where folklore falls short, Business Chemistry helps us look deeper. In the course of three online studies, the Deloitte Greenhouse team used a data-driven approach to see how working styles could aid in our understanding of millennials and how to maximize their strengths.

Business Chemistry uses analytics to reveal how each person reflects four scientifically based patterns of behavior: Pioneers, Drivers, Guardians, and Integrators. Knowing which traits emerge more strongly in which people can help drive more rewarding collaboration among people, within teams–and now, even between generations.

Learn how you can make the most of millennial talent.  Download the report and explore more insights: www.deloitte.com/us/MillennialMindset