Forbes asks, “How can leaders use Business Chemistry to get the most out of people?”

Kathy-Caprino_avatar_1515782327-400x400As part of Forbes’ Supporting Today’s Workforce series, Career Bliss Contributor, Kathy Caprino, interviewed Business Chemistry’s co-authors Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg about how leaders can use Business Chemistry to get the most out of their teams.

“A one-size-fits-all approach won’t work well on a team with a mix of types, as each type has different preferences in the workplace and different kinds of interactions or situations that can kill their potential or unlock it,” says Kim Christfort, National Managing Director of the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience.

Suzanne Vickberg, Business Chemistry’s lead researcher, said leaders can benefit when they have a mix of working types on their team.  “You wouldn’t want a team that was all about creative ideas with no focus on implementing those ideas. Or one that was just gunning for the big win with no attention paid to the people involved in getting there.”

Read Kathy’s entire interview to learn more about how leaders can build more dynamic teams, “The Four Key Working Styles that Create Business Chemistry–Which is Yours?”

 

Engaging Gen Y: 5 tips for CMOs to get the most from millennial talent

Cover ImageThe Wall Street Journal’s CMO Today section has published a new article based on our recent research, “Business Chemistry Reveals the Millennial Mindset.”  In that article they point to five tips that CMOs and other business leaders can use to engage the millennial generation.

“Millennials, the cohort commonly referred to as Generation Me, are most likely to identify with methodical, risk-averse Guardians than with any other type. Given millennials’ reputations for “thinking big” about their career aspirations and impact, this may seem counterintuitive. One possible explanation may be that, early in their careers, millennials were often relied upon—and rewarded for—their attention to detail and ability to follow a structured, methodical approach.”

“Understanding millennials’ work style types is one way that CMOs can engage millennial workers and help strengthen their commitment. In addition, CMOs and other business leaders can consider the following measures to make the most of millennial talent.”

Read the 5 tips for CMOs in today’s article.

CIOs can forge stronger working relationships, tap into team strengths, and help their organizations thrive

wsj_header2-870x276Leading in business today often means moving at a brisk pace, embracing a significant level of risk, and making decisions quickly. It can also require a certain level of adaptability and agility to navigate in uncertain times. Which behavioral types thrive in this kind of environment, and how can CIOs work with other types in the C-suite to drive success for their organizations?  Read the article in the Wall Street Journal’s CIO Corner.

October 5 webcast announced: Demystifying the millennial mindset

Webcast

Register today for our next webcast.  The generation that received its first high school diplomas in 2000 now includes many experienced professionals. Their reputation preceded them into the workforce: Entitled, self-centered. What is the reality? Based on the Deloitte Business Chemistry framework and three original research studies, we’ll discuss:

  • Why millennials are more likely than baby boomers or GenXers to be change-averse as Business Chemistry Guardians
  • The unique stresses this generation brings to, and finds within, professional life
  • The reason they may be “secret introverts” despite their hyper-networked communication habits

Click here to view the report: “The Millennial Mindset: Work styles and aspirations of millennials.”

Inspired leadership: Four elements effective leaders should master

Confessions_Ep#9_InspiredLeadershipAre leaders born or made?  In this week’s new episode of our Confessions podcast, “Inspired Leadership,” our guest, Steve Schloss, Chief People Officer at the United States Golf Association (USGA), says the answer is… both.

Tune in to hear Steve’s perspective on the qualities that make an effective leader, and the four core leadership disciplines— conscious leadership, connected leadership, informed leadership, and influential leadership—that he believes executives need to master in order to be truly successful.

Business Chemistry’s lead researcher, Suzanne Vicksburg and the Deloitte Greenhouse™ Experience national leader, Kim Christfort will join the conversation to provide their own insights and opinions.

Be sure to keep your ears open for more stories and thoughts from today’s leaders in our next episode, and check out Deloitte’s award-winning Resilience podcast and M&A’s Trends podcast series. Find both on Deloitte.com, Stitcher, or Apple’s podcast app

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types and share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @drsuzbizchem.

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Confession: Talk all you want, but listening is a key leadership skill

teaser_EP#8Download Confessions Episode No. 8: “Flexing for Success” with USGA’s Chief People Officer Steve Schloss

Effective leaders are big, bold, outspoken individuals who inspire confidence and loyalty through the sheer force of their dynamic personalities. Or, are they?

In this week’s episode of Confessions, we talk with Steven Schloss, Chief People Officer of the United States Golf Association, who says that while extroverts may come across as the more obvious leaders, their more reserved colleagues shouldn’t be overlooked.

“I’ve often said to people that if you want applause, you can talk all you want, but if you want results, you have to listen,” said Schloss.

Listen to this week’s episode, “Flexing for Success,” to hear his view on the value of introspection.

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Building Strong Teams–Confessions Episode 7

teaser_EP#7_2In our previous podcast episode of Confessions, we discussed the importance of smart risk taking with Mark Buthman, CFO Emeritus at Kimberly-Clark Corporation. In that discussion, Mark revealed an interesting fact about himself—he doesn’t possess the normally dominant Business Chemistry® traits of a CFO.

Whereas most CFOs identify as Drivers or Guardians—driven and/or analytical personality types—Mark is an Integrator and team builder. It’s a trait that would help him recognize the value of cognitive diversity within teams.

“One of the risks in finance, and [on] any leadership team—there’s a lot of analytical, decisive leaders around, but that doesn’t make for such diversity,” Buthman said.

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types or share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @DrSuzBizChem.

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CFO encourages risk-averse team to take a chance on success

teaser_EP#6Confessions Podcast Episode 6:  There are times when a business team and their leader don’t see eye-to-eye. In this episode of Business Chemistry’s® Confessions podcast, we hear how one very successful CFO encouraged his team to step out of their comfort zones and take more calculated risks to find success.

Smart Risk Taking” features Mark Buthman, CFO Emeritus at Kimberly-Clark Corporation, who was a square peg in a round hole; someone, who believed in the importance of risk taking while leading a risk-averse group of finance professionals. Buthman tells us why he believes taking risks is important to achieving both personal and professional growth, and how he instilled this belief in his team.

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types or share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @DrSuzBizChem.

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Guardians and Integrators aspire to become top performers and team players

BehindTheScenes

“They’re integral in making sure decisions are well thought out, but rarely does that research and information get distributed.”

Business Chemistry in the C-suite research suggests that individuals of all types aspire to lead, but Pioneers and Drivers are more likely than Guardians and Integrators to have such aspirations. When we asked more than 13,885 professionals across various organizational levels to select their top career aspirations, 68% of Drivers and 67% of Pioneers included leader, compared to 50% of Guardians and 51% of Integrators.  So, what do these types value beyond leadership roles?

Guardians and Integrators have some other strong aspirations, which may contribute to their being less likely to choose a leadership path, and their lower representation in the C-suite. Our research found that 50% of Guardians aspire to be top performers, 46% to be team players, 37% to be experts, and 36% to be mentors. And, 48% percent of Integrators aspire to be team players and 40% to be mentors.

Leaders should consider the unique strengths of Guardians and Integrators and their value behind the scenes to build strong, diverse teams.  Download the full study.