The Business Chemistry guide to navigating office holiday parties

‘Tis the sThe Business Chemistry guide to navigating office holiday partieseason for requisite office holiday parties, with the associated potential for social awkwardness as you mingle. At work parties, while there are many things to avoid doing in general (drunken karaoke probably being high on that list), there are also things that are particularly unappealing to specific individuals based on their different working styles. So to help make your interactions as pleasant as possible this season, here’s a quick list of what to do, and more importantly what NOT do, with each of the four main working styles you’ll see across your bosses and co-workers.

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New podcast series launched, Confessions. Episode 1: “The Monster that Harmony Made.”

confessions_squareWe are excited to announce our new podcast series, Confessions.  Hosted by Kim Christfort, National Managing Director of the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience, each episode explores true stories of workplace success and failure that all come down to one thing–Business Chemistry.

Learn how Business Chemistry can help you understand your own working style and how it’s similar to or different from others. Listen in as Kim talks with Suzanne Vickberg (Dr. Suz), Lead Researcher for Business Chemistry. Together, they’ll discuss techniques you can use to flex your style, improve your working relationships, and build stronger teams.

promo_monsterthatharmonymade“The monster that harmony made,” is our first episode and explores Betsy’s efforts to guide a team that’s enthusiastic about achieving project success, but whose desire for harmony creates one monstrous roadblock.  Can too many similar working styles hinder success? 

Listen today on your favorite device. 

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Hunching Pokémon Hunters

My family has been infected. By the Pokémon Go epidemic that is. Introduced to the app by a college-age neighbor, my twin 7-year-old sons came home with a sudden, unprecedented eagerness to join me on hikes and shopping trips (as long as I brought my phone, of course). Anything that would get them within range of their digital quarry. Overnight, my children became Pokémon hunters.

One trip to the mall and it quickly became clear that they weren’t the only ones smitten with this latest augmented reality phenomenon. All around me, people of all ages wandered trance-like through the parking lot staring at their phones, suddenly exclaiming when they spotted a Pokémon in their midst. This was clearly A Thing with universal appeal.

And yet…I couldn’t help but notice there were differences between these hunters, in spite of their common interest. Differences I suspected were tightly linked to their Business Chemistry types. So I decided to spend the weekend hunching these hunters and observing them in their (semi) natural environments to see how differences in style might be evident even in a shared mobile gaming experience. (Thanks to my friends and family for being unwitting participants in my research).

Of course I wasn’t able to conclude anything in a brief, unscientific weekend of observation, but I did develop some initial hypotheses. Here are my bets–what are yours?

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Fast Company: The 5 Types of Coworkers Who Can Make Your Work Life Infinitely Better

Fast Company recently published an article quoting Deloitte’s Leadership Center for Client’s National Director, Kim Christfort, who shared her insights about two of the four Deloitte Business Chemistry working styles and how to leverage these types to help you achieve success–Pioneers and Integrators.

Pioneers are great for helping teams brainstorm.  “If you need to change the lens on the way you are looking at something and trying something completely new, they’re the ones who love blue-sky innovation,” says Kim Christfort, national director of Deloitte’s Leadership Center for Clients.

Meanwhile, if you need a team player, who can build consensus or motivate a team, the integrator also adds great value.  “Integrators like to make connections and have a strong sense of empathy and nuance, so they’re good at reading people and understanding their needs. This is the person you want building and motivating your team.”

Read the article, “The 5 Types of Coworkers Who Can Make Your Life Infinitely Better,” by Gwen Moran, Fast Company and then let us know how the different types can help you achieve successful outcomes. 

Not Just Child’s Play: Learning Chemistry From Kindergarteners

Kim Christfort, leader of Deloitte’s Leadership Center for Clients and the US Greenhouses, has written an article that explores how Business Chemistry types can pair with one another in ways that make difference an advantage rather than a disadvantage.

She writes, “When I work with executives in our Leadership Center for Clients, I hear them talk about opposites, largely in reference to other executives. Idealistic vs. skeptical. Data-driven vs. intuitive. And my favorite: reasonable vs. unreasonable. That last one in particular captures my attention because it isn’t just an observation; it’s an interpretation. And that’s where things can get interesting.”

Read her entire article about using differences to your advantage published in Workforce.  You can also follow Kim on Twitter @Christfort.


Kim Christfort heads Deloitte’s Leadership Center for Clients Group (LCC), which helps executives tackle tough business challenges through immersive, facilitated Lab experiences and client experience IP such as Business Chemistry. As part of this role, Kim leads US Deloitte Greenhouses, permanent spaces designed to promote exploration and problem solving away from business as usual.

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