Are you ready to beat burnout? Biz Chem’s lead researcher offers insights

Suzanne Vickberg 2018 E WebIf you’re feeling stressed too often, maybe it’s time to consider whether you’re in an environment where you thrive?  If not, how can you find one?

Thrive Global has published a new article with Business Chemistry lead researcher, Dr. Suzanne Vickberg, “Essential Questions to Ask When You’re Stressed, Based on Your Working Style.”

“Our research with more than 40,000 individuals has shown that the four Business Chemistry types experience stress differently. Guardians, who value stability, feel stressed more often than their opposite type, Pioneers, who value possibilities. Integrators, who value connections, are more stressed than their opposite, Drivers, who value challenge. We’ve also found that the types use different methods for coping with stress,” writes Vickberg.

“We experience stress when we perceive a threat to something we care about. And because we don’t always differentiate between big threats and little threats, many of us walk around in a state of heightened stress much of the time,” she said.

Read her new byline and learn more about the key questions that may help you better navigate your next stressful situation.  New_CTA_Component

Engaging Gen Y: 5 tips for CMOs to get the most from millennial talent

Cover ImageThe Wall Street Journal’s CMO Today section has published a new article based on our recent research, “Business Chemistry Reveals the Millennial Mindset.”  In that article they point to five tips that CMOs and other business leaders can use to engage the millennial generation.

“Millennials, the cohort commonly referred to as Generation Me, are most likely to identify with methodical, risk-averse Guardians than with any other type. Given millennials’ reputations for “thinking big” about their career aspirations and impact, this may seem counterintuitive. One possible explanation may be that, early in their careers, millennials were often relied upon—and rewarded for—their attention to detail and ability to follow a structured, methodical approach.”

“Understanding millennials’ work style types is one way that CMOs can engage millennial workers and help strengthen their commitment. In addition, CMOs and other business leaders can consider the following measures to make the most of millennial talent.”

Read the 5 tips for CMOs in today’s article.

CIOs can forge stronger working relationships, tap into team strengths, and help their organizations thrive

wsj_header2-870x276Leading in business today often means moving at a brisk pace, embracing a significant level of risk, and making decisions quickly. It can also require a certain level of adaptability and agility to navigate in uncertain times. Which behavioral types thrive in this kind of environment, and how can CIOs work with other types in the C-suite to drive success for their organizations?  Read the article in the Wall Street Journal’s CIO Corner.

Think you know millennials? Think again says new Business Chemistry report

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Download the new report and register today for the upcoming webcast on October 5.

Never mind how old millennials are. The idea of them is 30 years old. It was 1987 when William Strauss and Neil Howe hung that name on the people who would start to graduate from high school at the turn of the coming century.

And ever since, we’ve often heard the same stereotypes: They’re self-centered. Entitled. They value passion over performance. Fulfillment over a full day’s work. And they don’t understand why no one has given them a corner office yet. Now that millennials are deep into the workforce, how well do these stereotypes really hold up?

Where folklore falls short, Business Chemistry helps us look deeper. In the course of three online studies, the Deloitte Greenhouse team used a data-driven approach to see how working styles could aid in our understanding of millennials and how to maximize their strengths.

Business Chemistry uses analytics to reveal how each person reflects four scientifically based patterns of behavior: Pioneers, Drivers, Guardians, and Integrators. Knowing which traits emerge more strongly in which people can help drive more rewarding collaboration among people, within teams–and now, even between generations.

Learn how you can make the most of millennial talent.  Download the report and explore more insights: www.deloitte.com/us/MillennialMindset

 

 

Inspired leadership: Four elements effective leaders should master

Confessions_Ep#9_InspiredLeadershipAre leaders born or made?  In this week’s new episode of our Confessions podcast, “Inspired Leadership,” our guest, Steve Schloss, Chief People Officer at the United States Golf Association (USGA), says the answer is… both.

Tune in to hear Steve’s perspective on the qualities that make an effective leader, and the four core leadership disciplines— conscious leadership, connected leadership, informed leadership, and influential leadership—that he believes executives need to master in order to be truly successful.

Business Chemistry’s lead researcher, Suzanne Vicksburg and the Deloitte Greenhouse™ Experience national leader, Kim Christfort will join the conversation to provide their own insights and opinions.

Be sure to keep your ears open for more stories and thoughts from today’s leaders in our next episode, and check out Deloitte’s award-winning Resilience podcast and M&A’s Trends podcast series. Find both on Deloitte.com, Stitcher, or Apple’s podcast app

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types and share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @drsuzbizchem.

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The Business Chemistry guide to navigating office holiday parties

‘Tis the sThe Business Chemistry guide to navigating office holiday partieseason for requisite office holiday parties, with the associated potential for social awkwardness as you mingle. At work parties, while there are many things to avoid doing in general (drunken karaoke probably being high on that list), there are also things that are particularly unappealing to specific individuals based on their different working styles. So to help make your interactions as pleasant as possible this season, here’s a quick list of what to do, and more importantly what NOT do, with each of the four main working styles you’ll see across your bosses and co-workers.

Continue reading “The Business Chemistry guide to navigating office holiday parties”

Have a tough nut to crack? Play Biz Chem 20 Questions

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A friend recently tried to convince me to try a really out of the way sushi restaurant. I live in Southern California, so sushi restaurants are a dime a dozen.

I asked her, “Why would I travel so far for this one?”

In response, she provided several other restaurant options, but outlined the reasons why her choice was better than the others. She sent me reviews and ratings. She also forwarded GPS directions, including several different routes, and assured me we could avoid traffic if we chose the right route for the right time.

Continue reading “Have a tough nut to crack? Play Biz Chem 20 Questions”

Guardians: How to spot one and what to do about it

Guardians

Now that you’ve learned how to recognize and better work with Drivers, Pioneers, and Integrators, this final post in the series will address spotting and working with Guardians. After reading all four you’ll be that much closer to Business Chemistry ninja status.


Spotting a Guardian

Guardian motto: Changing the World, One Spreadsheet at a Time

Methodical. That’s the number one characteristic of the Guardian. They’re also structured, meticulous, focused on the details, and practical. If you’re paying attention to these things a Guardian is easy to spot, but because they’re also reserved, they don’t always make themselves known. You may need to be on the lookout for them.

Guardians are also likely to be conventional, hierarchical, disciplined, and frugal. They’re likely to speak slowly, or, as the most introverted of the four types, not at all, especially if others are dominating the conversation or fighting for the floor.

When it comes to making decisions, a Guardian usually isn’t in a hurry. They’re most comfortable with what’s familiar and they tend to be risk averse, so when making a decision that involves a new direction they’re going to want to check every detail. They may seek out benchmarks and best practices to ground the decision and make them more comfortable with a change. They’ll likely use a deliberate and methodical process for reaching a decision and once they’ve made up their mind they’re unlikely to change it. I’ve written before about the Guardian’s tendency to go with the status quo.

Continue reading “Guardians: How to spot one and what to do about it”

Integrators: How to spot one and what to do about it

Integrators

I previously shared thoughts on how to recognize and work with Drivers and Pioneers. In this third installment I’ll address how to know when you’re working with an Integrator, and what to do about it. Because of course, doing something about it is really the point of Business Chemistry.

Spotting an Integrator

Integrator motto: Consensus Rules!

The Integrator’s strongest traits are their tendency to avoid confrontation and seek consensus, their empathy, and their tolerance of ambiguity.

Integrators are connectors. They connect with people, emphasizing relationships and striving to be helpful. And they connect ideas. Their way of thinking is nonlinear, big-picture, and contextual. They’re also traditional, trusting, and dutiful.

Integrators tend to think through decisions carefully and to seek a lot of input from others, trying to get a sense of whether people are in agreement. They’re not particularly keen on risk-taking, but if they see the group heading in that direction they may be inclined to get on board. The people-implications of a decision are likely to be important to an Integrator and they’ll consider these carefully. They’re also prone to changing their mind, which I’ve written about before.

Continue reading “Integrators: How to spot one and what to do about it”