CFO encourages risk-averse team to take a chance on success

teaser_EP#6Confessions Podcast Episode 6:  There are times when a business team and their leader don’t see eye-to-eye. In this episode of Business Chemistry’s® Confessions podcast, we hear how one very successful CFO encouraged his team to step out of their comfort zones and take more calculated risks to find success.

Smart Risk Taking” features Mark Buthman, CFO Emeritus at Kimberly-Clark Corporation, who was a square peg in a round hole; someone, who believed in the importance of risk taking while leading a risk-averse group of finance professionals. Buthman tells us why he believes taking risks is important to achieving both personal and professional growth, and how he instilled this belief in his team.

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types or share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @DrSuzBizChem.

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“Different perspectives may bring in some healthy conflict” –New article in AB magazine

CxO_Image_350X350A new article featuring Business Chemistry has been published in the July/August issue of  Accounting and Business magazine.  The article features Kim Christfort, national managing director of the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience, and Karen Brown, Deloitte Greenhouse and client experience lead in Southeast Asia.  Christfort and Brown share perspectives for the board of directors from the CXO Study and how business teams can achieve more by embracing team diversity.

‘The most important thing is to recognize that other people are most likely not just like you, and to start listening and watching for the clues that will tell you what “working-style language” they’re speaking. And once you do, you can then figure out the best ways, to give each of these styles a voice so that you can reap the benefits of diversity,” said Kim Christfort.

Abraham Lincoln, The Great Integrator- a new video in The Four Types collection

We are excited to reveal a new video in our Business Chemistry Four Types collection.  This series of fun videos based on famous historical figures are intended to help you better understand the characteristics of each of the Business Chemistry types.

After months of historical research, we believe that Abraham Lincoln depicted many of the Integrator’s traits–diplomatic, empathetic, optimistic, and others–and he joins our series as “The Great Integrator.”

Since Integrators love teamwork, we hope that you will help us spread the word!  Go ahead!  Share the new video with all of your colleagues and through your social channels.  If you want to learn more about working with Integrators, don’t forget to check this previous post.  And, you can find our entire collection of The Four Types videos on YouTube.

 

 

Guardians and Integrators aspire to become top performers and team players

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“They’re integral in making sure decisions are well thought out, but rarely does that research and information get distributed.”

Business Chemistry in the C-suite research suggests that individuals of all types aspire to lead, but Pioneers and Drivers are more likely than Guardians and Integrators to have such aspirations. When we asked more than 13,885 professionals across various organizational levels to select their top career aspirations, 68% of Drivers and 67% of Pioneers included leader, compared to 50% of Guardians and 51% of Integrators.  So, what do these types value beyond leadership roles?

Guardians and Integrators have some other strong aspirations, which may contribute to their being less likely to choose a leadership path, and their lower representation in the C-suite. Our research found that 50% of Guardians aspire to be top performers, 46% to be team players, 37% to be experts, and 36% to be mentors. And, 48% percent of Integrators aspire to be team players and 40% to be mentors.

Leaders should consider the unique strengths of Guardians and Integrators and their value behind the scenes to build strong, diverse teams.  Download the full study.

 

The Chemistry of Trust: 8 Ways to Build More of It

What if you could be the kind of leader whose team had increased energy, was more productive, collaborated better with their colleagues, and stayed with your organization longer? What if your people suffered less chronic stress and were happier with their lives?

In the Neuroscience of Trust, published in a recent issue of Harvard Business Review, Paul Zak suggests that you can be that kind of leader by increasing trust on your team. He proposes eight management behaviors to help you do so. In considering his ideas, I matched his suggestions up against the Business Chemistry types, knowing that different things make the various types tick. Here are the eight proposed behaviors and the types with which they’re most likely to be effective…

Induce “challenge” stress. Zak suggests that challenge stress, brought on by assigning teams difficult but achievable tasks, releases chemicals in our brains that increase social connections. This technique may be particularly effective for Drivers, who are more likely than the other types to report that they thrive in the face of challenging tasks. 1

Give people discretion in how they do their work. In other words, enable autonomy by allowing people to complete projects in their own way—if you trust your people, they’re more likely to trust you. When asked about autonomy, Pioneers and Drivers (particularly D-Scientists) say it’s more important to them than Integrators and Guardians do.

Enable job crafting. Job crafting means, in part, empowering people to choose which projects they work on. This technique may be particularly successful with Pioneers, who are the most likely type to say they thrive when they have opportunities to learn and try new things. Who knows better which work has the right level of “new” than your people themselves?

Share information widely. Zak suggests that lack of information about an organization’s direction can cause chronic stress among employees. Cultivating trust by sharing such information may be most essential with Guardians, who our research suggests experience the highest levels of stress, and are also the type most likely to say clear expectations are important to them.

Recognize excellence. A little recognition is likely to go long a long way for all types of people, but our research shows that Guardians and Integrators are more likely than Pioneers and Drivers to say that recognition is a key ingredient for them to thrive at work. Given that the work of these types can sometimes go unseen, acknowledging their contributions could be a particularly effective trust-builder with them.

Intentionally build relationships. Zak cites his own research suggesting that creating social ties at work improves performance. This may be particularly valuable with Integrators, who are the most relationship-focused type and also the most likely to say that working with people they enjoy is a priority for them. A little bit of focused attention to relationship-building can help in creating mutual trust.

Facilitate whole person growth. By whole-person growth Zak means helping people grow both professionally and personally, and that can mean different things for different people. While all the types put a high priority on a feeling of accomplishment, Drivers, particularly D-Commanders, are more likely than the other types to say advancement is important to them, while Guardians and Integrators prioritize work-life balance more than others, and Pioneers are the most likely type to say it’s important to know they’re making a difference in the world. When your people know you understand them and see them as people, not just employees, they’re more likely to put their trust in you.

Show vulnerability: As a leader, being vulnerable enough to ask for help when you need it is perhaps one of the scariest but most effective means of role-modeling trust. Doing so demonstrates to all types of people that asking for help is okay, that they can trust you enough to ask when they need it. By asking your people to have your back, you’ll show them that you’re going to have theirs. And isn’t that really what trust is all about?

Dr. Suz

Suzanne Vickberg, PhD (aka Dr. Suz)

Dr. Suz is the Greenhouse Team’s very own social-personality psychologist, which means she studies how people’s thoughts, behaviors and preferences are influenced by both who they are and the situations they’re in. She uses Business Chemistry to help teams explore how the mix of perspectives brought by their individual members influences their work together. Follow her on Twitter @DrSuzBizChem

1Research findings in this post are based on a study with 13,885 professionals of varying levels working outside Deloitte, in the US and elsewhere. Participants represent more than 1,200 organizations across various industries, and 115 countries overall. During the period of February, 2016 to November, 2016 participants completed the Business Chemistry assessment online and also answered questions about their career aspirations, career priorities, and the working conditions under which they thrive. For each question, respondents were asked to select their top three options out of a list of 10. The margin error for this sample is less than two percentage points at a 95 percent confidence level, for all Business Chemistry types.

Business, Life, and Coffee podcast, “The Four Personality Types That Dominate The C-Suite”

56a8aa9eca44b8450c5cb5bd_loThe Business, Life, and Coffee Podcast hosted by Joey Price, CEO of Jumpstart HR, speaks with Kim Christfort, National Managing Director of The Deloitte Greenhouse Experience team.  Kim shares her insights on Deloitte’s newly published research,  Business Chemistry in the C-suite.  They also discuss how Business Chemistry can help forge stronger working relationships and how leaders can accomplish more with diverse teams.  Listen and share your thoughts!

Good Morning America hosts hunch their Business Chemistry types

GMAAre you a Pioneer, Guardian, Driver, or an Integrator? The hosts of ABC’s Good Morning America talk about Business Chemistry’s four different personality types and the research published in Harvard Business Review.  Don’t miss Lara Spencer’s response as they determine which Business Chemistry type best describes their leadership style.

Harvard Business Review Podcast: How Personalities Affect Team Chemistry

rec_glb_ho_1850_loHarvard Business Review has released a new podcast with Deloitte Greenhouse Experience National Managing Director Kim Christfort, who talks about the different personality styles in an organization and the challenges of bringing them together. Deloitte’s Business Chemistry system helps companies better understand personality styles and capitalize on their cognitive diversity. She and Suzanne M. Johnson Vickberg coauthored the article, “Pioneers, Drivers, Integrators, and Guardians” in the March-April 2017 issue of Harvard Business Review.

Chemistry in the C-suite webcast now available on demand

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More than 1,000 people joined our live webcast about the findings from the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience’s new study, Business Chemistry in the C-suite. A replay of the webcast is now available on demand.

Kim Christfort, the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience National Managing Director and one of the original architects of Business Chemistry, and Suzanne Vickberg, social-personality psychologist and Business Chemistry’s lead researcher, provided insights for current and aspiring leaders, as well as those who work with them.  Topics included the following:

  • Results of our study and findings related to function, organization size, industry, and gender
  • Insights about the traits that uniquely characterize C-suite executives
  • Tips that aspiring executives can consider in their own career paths
  • Strategies for leaders and those who work with them to use their understanding of various working styles to manage and benefit from diversity

 

Take a Lunch Break with Wall Street Journal Live, “Can a successful executive not be disciplined?”

WSJLiveDeloitte’s new study, Business Chemistry in the C-suite. was featured on Wall Street Journal Live’s Lunch Break.

“What drives the success of C-suite executives? National Managing Director for the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience Kim Christfort reveals the results of a survey of nearly 700 executives that shows while they are similar to many professionals, they are unique in their approach to problems in creative thinking.”