Think you know millennials? Think again says new Business Chemistry report

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Download the new report and register today for the upcoming webcast on October 5.

Never mind how old millennials are. The idea of them is 30 years old. It was 1987 when William Strauss and Neil Howe hung that name on the people who would start to graduate from high school at the turn of the coming century.

And ever since, we’ve often heard the same stereotypes: They’re self-centered. Entitled. They value passion over performance. Fulfillment over a full day’s work. And they don’t understand why no one has given them a corner office yet. Now that millennials are deep into the workforce, how well do these stereotypes really hold up?

Where folklore falls short, Business Chemistry helps us look deeper. In the course of three online studies, the Deloitte Greenhouse team used a data-driven approach to see how working styles could aid in our understanding of millennials and how to maximize their strengths.

Business Chemistry uses analytics to reveal how each person reflects four scientifically based patterns of behavior: Pioneers, Drivers, Guardians, and Integrators. Knowing which traits emerge more strongly in which people can help drive more rewarding collaboration among people, within teams–and now, even between generations.

Learn how you can make the most of millennial talent.  Download the report and explore more insights: www.deloitte.com/us/MillennialMindset

 

 

Inspired leadership: Four elements effective leaders should master

Confessions_Ep#9_InspiredLeadershipAre leaders born or made?  In this week’s new episode of our Confessions podcast, “Inspired Leadership,” our guest, Steve Schloss, Chief People Officer at the United States Golf Association (USGA), says the answer is… both.

Tune in to hear Steve’s perspective on the qualities that make an effective leader, and the four core leadership disciplines— conscious leadership, connected leadership, informed leadership, and influential leadership—that he believes executives need to master in order to be truly successful.

Business Chemistry’s lead researcher, Suzanne Vicksburg and the Deloitte Greenhouse™ Experience national leader, Kim Christfort will join the conversation to provide their own insights and opinions.

Be sure to keep your ears open for more stories and thoughts from today’s leaders in our next episode, and check out Deloitte’s award-winning Resilience podcast and M&A’s Trends podcast series. Find both on Deloitte.com, Stitcher, or Apple’s podcast app

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types and share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @drsuzbizchem.

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Confession: Talk all you want, but listening is a key leadership skill

teaser_EP#8Download Confessions Episode No. 8: “Flexing for Success” with USGA’s Chief People Officer Steve Schloss

Effective leaders are big, bold, outspoken individuals who inspire confidence and loyalty through the sheer force of their dynamic personalities. Or, are they?

In this week’s episode of Confessions, we talk with Steven Schloss, Chief People Officer of the United States Golf Association, who says that while extroverts may come across as the more obvious leaders, their more reserved colleagues shouldn’t be overlooked.

“I’ve often said to people that if you want applause, you can talk all you want, but if you want results, you have to listen,” said Schloss.

Listen to this week’s episode, “Flexing for Success,” to hear his view on the value of introspection.

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Building Strong Teams–Confessions Episode 7

teaser_EP#7_2In our previous podcast episode of Confessions, we discussed the importance of smart risk taking with Mark Buthman, CFO Emeritus at Kimberly-Clark Corporation. In that discussion, Mark revealed an interesting fact about himself—he doesn’t possess the normally dominant Business Chemistry® traits of a CFO.

Whereas most CFOs identify as Drivers or Guardians—driven and/or analytical personality types—Mark is an Integrator and team builder. It’s a trait that would help him recognize the value of cognitive diversity within teams.

“One of the risks in finance, and [on] any leadership team—there’s a lot of analytical, decisive leaders around, but that doesn’t make for such diversity,” Buthman said.

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types or share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @DrSuzBizChem.

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CFO encourages risk-averse team to take a chance on success

teaser_EP#6Confessions Podcast Episode 6:  There are times when a business team and their leader don’t see eye-to-eye. In this episode of Business Chemistry’s® Confessions podcast, we hear how one very successful CFO encouraged his team to step out of their comfort zones and take more calculated risks to find success.

Smart Risk Taking” features Mark Buthman, CFO Emeritus at Kimberly-Clark Corporation, who was a square peg in a round hole; someone, who believed in the importance of risk taking while leading a risk-averse group of finance professionals. Buthman tells us why he believes taking risks is important to achieving both personal and professional growth, and how he instilled this belief in his team.

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types or share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @DrSuzBizChem.

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Business, Life, and Coffee podcast, “The Four Personality Types That Dominate The C-Suite”

56a8aa9eca44b8450c5cb5bd_loThe Business, Life, and Coffee Podcast hosted by Joey Price, CEO of Jumpstart HR, speaks with Kim Christfort, National Managing Director of The Deloitte Greenhouse Experience team.  Kim shares her insights on Deloitte’s newly published research,  Business Chemistry in the C-suite.  They also discuss how Business Chemistry can help forge stronger working relationships and how leaders can accomplish more with diverse teams.  Listen and share your thoughts!

Harvard Business Review Podcast: How Personalities Affect Team Chemistry

rec_glb_ho_1850_loHarvard Business Review has released a new podcast with Deloitte Greenhouse Experience National Managing Director Kim Christfort, who talks about the different personality styles in an organization and the challenges of bringing them together. Deloitte’s Business Chemistry system helps companies better understand personality styles and capitalize on their cognitive diversity. She and Suzanne M. Johnson Vickberg coauthored the article, “Pioneers, Drivers, Integrators, and Guardians” in the March-April 2017 issue of Harvard Business Review.

Business Chemistry Featured in Harvard Business Review Spotlight on the New Science of Teamwork

1417 MarApr17 Cover_CMYK.inddPioneers, Drivers, Integrators, and Guardians

Every team is a mix of these personality types. Here’s how to get the best out of any combination.

by Suzanne M. Johnson Vickberg and Kim Christfort

Published in Harvard Business Review, March/April, 2017

Organizations aren’t getting the performance they need from their teams. That’s the message we hear from many of our clients, who wrestle with complex challenges ranging from strategic planning to change management. But often, the fault doesn’t lie with the team members, our research suggests. Rather, it’s often leaders who fail to effectively tap diverse work styles and perspectives—even at the senior-most levels. Business Chemistry can help.

A first step is to identify the work styles of your team members and begin to consider how similarities and differences are beneficial or problematic. How many detail-oriented Guardians do you have versus big picture Pioneers? What’s the balance of competitive Drivers with consensus-oriented Integrators? How are these diverse styles complementing or conflicting with one another?

Next, it’s time to actively manage those similarities and differences. Read our full article in Harvard Business Review for more detail on these strategies for doing so.

  • Pull your opposites closer. Often, the biggest pain points are in one-on-one relationships, when opposite styles collide. By pulling your opposites closer—having them work together on small projects, and then bigger ones if it’s working out—you can begin to create complementary partnerships on your teams. It’s also important to pull your own opposites closer to you, to balance your tendencies as a leader.
  • Elevate the “tokens” on your team. When a team’s makeup is lopsided, cognitive bias can creep in, often leading to “cascades” or momentum that carries the team in the direction of the most common viewpoint. Your goal here should be to elevate minority perspectives on the team without turning others off. This way you can benefit from all the perspectives represented, not just those in the majority.
  • Pay close attention to your sensitive introverts. While a cascading team may lose out on contributions from any style that’s in the minority, members who are most introverted or sensitive can be at greatest risk of being drowned out. So that you don’t lose out on the unique strengths brought by these types, make an effort to understand how the team’s ways of working are supporting them to make their best contribution, or not.

Dr. Suz

Suzanne Vickberg, PhD (aka Dr. Suz)

Dr. Suz is the Greenhouse Team’s very own social-personality psychologist, which means she studies how people’s thoughts, behaviors and preferences are influenced by both who they are and the situations they’re in. She uses Business Chemistry to help teams explore how the mix of perspectives brought by their individual members influences their work together. Follow her on Twitter @DrSuzBizChem


This publication contains general information only and Deloitte is not, by means of this publication, rendering accounting, business, financial, investment, legal, tax, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such professional advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified professional advisor. Deloitte shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person who relies on this publication.

About Deloitte

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as “Deloitte Global”) does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about for a detailed description of DTTL and its member firms. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting.

Copyright © 2017 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.

Six Workplace Trends to Watch in 2017

With the arrival of 2017, we’ve been spending time sizing up some of the many important developments, issues and trends in the workplace. And let us tell you: from tools, to employee experience, to team dynamics, workplace habits are a-changing. Teams are on the rise, the next generation of leaders are reshaping their work environments as I write, and the employer-employee contract continues to actively evolve.

Our analysis included published research findings, our own experience consulting to client companies, and ongoing monitoring of corporate commitments and published policies….With a bit of clairvoyance mixed in!

Color us *unsurprised* that Business Chemistry’s value had rarely been clearer. Continue reading “Six Workplace Trends to Watch in 2017”