Business Chemistry: A data-driven approach to workplace dynamics

Mentors The Mentors host Tom Loarie talks with authors and innovators Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg, Ph.D. (aka Dr. Suz) who lead the development of Business Chemistry® (also the title of their book). This is cutting-edge innovation for the workplace. Deloitte teamed with scientists from the fields of neuro-anthropology and genetics to develop a system that leverages modern computational techniques to bring a data-driven approach to observing and understanding differences in people’s business styles.

Listen to the podcast and get show notes on their website.  #WednesdayWisdom

Making a New City Your Home

Happy friends discussing at table in restaurantAn article from The New York Times features insights on fitting into a new town where nobody knows your name–yet.

If you are a recent college graduate or moving for a new role, your job can provide a support system in establishing new connections.

In the article, Kim Christfort, National Managing Director of the Deloitte Greenhouse, provides insights on adapting to new teams and cultivating friendships. “To the extent that you can connect with people and have some sort of relationship, it makes it easier to do your job,” Christfort said.

Click here to get tips on turning an unfamiliar place into one you can call home.

SF Review of Books reviews Practical Magic. Now, it’s your turn.

CoverSan Francisco Review of Books has released its review of Business Chemistry: Practical Magic for Crafting Powerful Work Relationships. 

For good relationships to become great collaborations, those involved must develop precisely the same chemistry on which Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg focus in this book,” writes Robert Morris, who has reviewed more than 3,400 books.

Have you read Practical Magic for Crafting Powerful Work Relationships?  Share your own review on Amazon.com or other book sites and let us know your thoughts.

Why you shouldn’t hire people based on “fit”

Christfort_0510Final_CroppedWould you enjoy being stuck in an airport with Kim Christfort, National Managing Director of the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience? If after chatting with her–or anyone else–for half an hour you don’t think so, there’s a good chance you wouldn’t choose them to be on your team. This screening technique is commonly known as the airport test, and the basic assumption behind it may be flawed. Kim has another suggestion.  Find out more in this LinkedIn article.  (And, don’t be shy–share it with others!)

Forbes asks, “How can leaders use Business Chemistry to get the most out of people?”

Kathy-Caprino_avatar_1515782327-400x400As part of Forbes’ Supporting Today’s Workforce series, Career Bliss Contributor, Kathy Caprino, interviewed Business Chemistry’s co-authors Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg about how leaders can use Business Chemistry to get the most out of their teams.

“A one-size-fits-all approach won’t work well on a team with a mix of types, as each type has different preferences in the workplace and different kinds of interactions or situations that can kill their potential or unlock it,” says Kim Christfort, National Managing Director of the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience.

Suzanne Vickberg, Business Chemistry’s lead researcher, said leaders can benefit when they have a mix of working types on their team.  “You wouldn’t want a team that was all about creative ideas with no focus on implementing those ideas. Or one that was just gunning for the big win with no attention paid to the people involved in getting there.”

Read Kathy’s entire interview to learn more about how leaders can build more dynamic teams, “The Four Key Working Styles that Create Business Chemistry–Which is Yours?”