Dr. Suz introduces Business Chemistry next week to the Crossroads of America

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Suzanne Vickberg 2018 E WebAre you headed to the Indiana Conference for Women next week?  Us, too!  Dr. Suzanne Vickberg, Business Chemistry’s Lead Researcher, is scheduled to speak on Nov. 8 at one of the largest one-day events for professional and entrepreneurial women in the Midwest.  Come join us at this exciting conference!

Suzanne will introduce the power of Business Chemistry during this educational and inspirational women’s conference, which seeks to build a strong ecosystem to help women build careers, create companies, and experience lives that are rewarding, healthy and fulfilling. The Founders believe (and research shows) that environments that foster the growth and development of women lead to healthier and more resilient communities and stronger economic growth.

To support the goal of personal growth and development, Dr. Suz will lead participants through an interactive and engaging experience that will help them learn about what  makes some teams excel, while others fumble.  She’ll introduce techniques that help teams thrive, tips for leaders that will motivate individuals, and insights that can help you build powerful work relationships.  It will be an engaging and fun learning event you don’t want to miss.

We hope to see you in the Crossroads of America!

 

 

Can you spot the Business Chemistry type in Halloween costumes? (It’s just for fun!)

My boss, who is a Pioneer and a big Halloween fan, challenged our team to submit our Halloween costume photos for our next team meeting.  A few of the team members instantly began to get excited and collaborate on costume ideas, while others were less enthusiastic.  As I was observing the ideas by my colleagues, I quietly pondered the question: Do Business Chemistry types align with particular costume preferences?

Shelley is Practical Magic
Surprise Kim & Suzanne! I’m “Practical Magic” Shelley for my 2018 Halloween costume.

So, in the spirit of Halloween fun, we thought we’d hunch about what one’s costume selection might say about their working style (now you know how we have fun when we’re not working at the Deloitte Greenhouse):

  • Beneath a warrior, superhero, or king costume you could find a Driver. These characters are focused and competitive, and let nothing stand in the way of making progress on achieving their goals. They save the world from impending doom and make it home for supper—on time. They’re not particularly worried that they tore up an entire city to save you from an alien invasion because it had to get done. And, when facing their nemesis, they are logical in finding a solution to thwart the evil-doer’s plans.
  • The good witch, friendly ghost, or furry animal costume just might have an Integrator inside. These characters are diplomatic and non-confrontational. They are found in fairy-tales in which everyone gets along, finds the other slipper, and lives happily-ever-after. They say hello to everyone in the village and do no harm.  Integrators’ costumes aren’t scary and encourage the spirit of sharing candy.
  • A Pioneer may choose a costume no one saw coming. They are the “hanging chad,” the Southern belle turned into “Taco Belle,” or the couple that shows up as peanut butter and jelly. They didn’t buy their costume ahead of time when there were plenty of choices. Instead, they must go through everyone’s closet a couple of hours before the party to pull together something you’ll never forget.
  • A Guardian might be a bit reluctant to embrace this whole dressing up thing. They may feel they’ll look silly, or be concerned they won’t have time to find the right costume, or want more specific parameters for dressing like something they are not.  Or, they just might surprise everyone by using a costume as an opportunity to leave their reserve behind and become their alter ego for a day. A Guardian, who doesn’t want to dress up, may want to join the fun by serving as a judge for the costume contest. They will judge everyone fairly, ignore crowd influence, and follow to the letter the rules and guidelines set for the contest.
You are just my type
You are just my type… to buy your team a copy of Practical Magic!

Of course, while the Business Chemistry types are based on a mathematical algorithm, our costume theory is just a fun hunch. What’s your take? Does your Halloween costume fit with your type? Send your photos and let us know!

For more treats (not tricks) that can turn challenging work situations into something more heavenly using the science of Business Chemistry, pick up a copy of Practical Magic for Crafting Powerful Work Relationships today.

Happy Halloween Business Chemistry fans!

Five Attributes Of Cultural Fit For Buyer-Supplier Relationships

shutterstock_240995827_loMost organizations hire suppliers based on their capabilities and cost, but integrating five attributes of cultural fit to the mix can lead to healthier and more sustainable supplier relationships.  Forbes contributor Kate Vitasek covers a recent social debate about typical hiring practices, and whether they apply to supplier relationships, sparked by the authors of Practical Magic for Crafting Powerful Work RelationshipsDeloitte’s Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg.

Read the Forbes article and share your thoughts.

 

“Hey, was that a squirrel?”

Mashup The choreography! The tap-your-toe inspirational music! The applause-worthy costume design! The unforgettable performances by the Pioneer, Driver, Guardian, and Integrator!  It’s just another day with Deloitte’s Business Chemistry team. What could your team do when it learns to click, not clash? Watch this awesome video and share it with colleagues!

Note:  Pioneers love exclamation marks!  It’s just so exciting!

 

How to activate the benefits of diversity

shutterstock_299889119_loBusinesses have long used personality tests in recruitment and in training and development. Indeed, it is a rare manager who has not been through some sort of personality assessment. But, with workforces becoming more diverse in terms of race, gender and age, it is arguable that leaders need to have a much better understanding of what makes their colleagues tick and how they can encourage them to work together effectively.

“While the benefits of diversity are real, they’re far from automatic. They must be activated.”  To learn how, read the article in Forbes by Roger Trapp, “How Different Personalities Can Work Together.”

 

Business Chemistry: A data-driven approach to workplace dynamics

Mentors The Mentors host Tom Loarie talks with authors and innovators Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg, Ph.D. (aka Dr. Suz) who lead the development of Business Chemistry® (also the title of their book). This is cutting-edge innovation for the workplace. Deloitte teamed with scientists from the fields of neuro-anthropology and genetics to develop a system that leverages modern computational techniques to bring a data-driven approach to observing and understanding differences in people’s business styles.

Listen to the podcast and get show notes on their website.  #WednesdayWisdom

Business Chemistry Insiders: Don’t miss Sunday’s big deal!

Good news Business Chemistry fans!  Amazon has added Practical Magic for Crafting Powerful Work Relationships to its Prime Week promotions, which will include a great discount we can’t yet reveal.   The lightning deal starts at 2:25 p.m. ET on Sunday, July 15, and ends at 8:25 p.m. ET.

If you already own #PracticalMagic, this is a great time to pick up copies for your team, colleagues, and anyone else that could benefit from learning more about the kind of chemistry that fuels workplace success.  (Hint, hint, office Secret Santa!)

Flexing can help you click with opposing work styles

With different personalities in every office, how do you get co-workers to co-exist? A new book, “Business Chemistry: Practical Magic for Crafting Powerful Work Relationship ” finds there are four distinct personality types and working styles. CNBC’s “On the Money” talked with author Suzanne Vickberg about how can everyone get along and get more work done?

CNBC

Making a New City Your Home

Happy friends discussing at table in restaurantAn article from The New York Times features insights on fitting into a new town where nobody knows your name–yet.

If you are a recent college graduate or moving for a new role, your job can provide a support system in establishing new connections.

In the article, Kim Christfort, National Managing Director of the Deloitte Greenhouse, provides insights on adapting to new teams and cultivating friendships. “To the extent that you can connect with people and have some sort of relationship, it makes it easier to do your job,” Christfort said.

Click here to get tips on turning an unfamiliar place into one you can call home.

SF Review of Books reviews Practical Magic. Now, it’s your turn.

CoverSan Francisco Review of Books has released its review of Business Chemistry: Practical Magic for Crafting Powerful Work Relationships. 

For good relationships to become great collaborations, those involved must develop precisely the same chemistry on which Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg focus in this book,” writes Robert Morris, who has reviewed more than 3,400 books.

Have you read Practical Magic for Crafting Powerful Work Relationships?  Share your own review on Amazon.com or other book sites and let us know your thoughts.