Why people think you don’t appreciate them, even when you do

shutterstock_22905142 [thank you] (3) - Copy

Silent gratitude isn’t much use to anyone.“ –Gladys Bronwyn Stern

When did you last ask someone how they like to be recognized? Maybe you don’t think you need to ask, because you already know what people want. They want money. Or they want to be acknowledged by leaders. Or, when they hit it out of the park, they want everyone to know about it.

Do they really?

We surveyed more than 16,000 professionals about how they want to be recognized, and for what, and by whom. We found that what one person wants is often different from what someone else wants. And further, that those differences are related to one’s generation, gender, organizational level, and Business Chemistry type. Read the full report for all the findings: The practical magic of ‘thank you’: How your people want to be recognized, and for what, and by whom. Read on here for a summary.

Business Chemistry® is Deloitte’s framework for understanding and engaging different working styles, which was highlighted in HBR in March-April 2017. There are four primary Business Chemistry types, each with unique perspectives and strengths. Pioneers value possibilities and they spark energy and imagination. Guardians value stability and they bring order and rigor. Drivers value challenge and they generate momentum. Integrators value connection and they draw teams together.

Understanding individual worker preferences can be critical to creating an employee experience that is personalized, flexible, and customizable. And using Business Chemistry to frame these preferences helps us identify practical strategies for creating stronger working relationships and inclusive environments where all types excel and thrive.

So, what do people want?

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Integrators value connection and they draw teams together

*This is the final post in a four-part series about the Business Chemistry types. Check out the first, second, and third posts in the series, about Pioneers, Guardians, and Drivers respectively. Subscribe here so you don’t miss future posts! 

CONNECTION—that’s what it’s all about for Integrators, and connector is the role they often play on a team. Sometimes an Integrator is focused on creating connections between people, and other times on connections between ideas. Either way, Integrators like working on teams more than toiling away in solitude. They’re trusting and they forge deep relationships—beyond networking or teamwork—getting up close and personal to form real friendships with colleagues. 

And there are lots of reasons you’d want to be friends with an Integrator. For one thing, they go out of their way to be helpful. You know that one colleague who’s always happy to pitch in and does so with a smile? They’re probably an Integrator.

Integrators are great listeners and observers too. They pay close attention to what’s being said and can often sense even unspoken emotions and reactions. And then they take others’ feelings into account. An Integrator knows that sticks and stones aren’t the only things that can hurt relationships—words can too, and they bear this in mind when they consider how to deliver a message. Integrators place a high value on traditions, and this too reflects their sensitivity to the feelings of others. After all, where do traditions come from? People. And from the Integrator’s perspective, things that are important to people deserve respect.

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Drivers value challenge and they generate momentum

*This is the third post in a four-part series about the Business Chemistry types. Check out the first and second posts in the series, about Pioneers and Guardians, respectively, and watch for the upcoming post about Integrators. Subscribe here so you don’t miss it! 

Ask people the best thing about Drivers, and a clear theme emerges: They get sh*t done. Even when it’s difficult. Especially when it’s difficult. Because if you had to capture the spirit of Drivers in a word, it would be CHALLENGE. Drivers love a challenge, and they love to challenge. They are focused and competitive. To get the results they want, Drivers will calculate the shortest possible path and stay on course despite whatever, or whoever, gets in their way. This directness infuses everything they do, from the way they make decisions to the way they interact with others. They like to get to the point.

Drivers are not the warmest and fuzziest of the types. They don’t mince words and they don’t sugarcoat. Expecting small talk? Drivers see it as a waste of time. No clear agenda? Come back when you have one. Vague ambitions? Intuitive conclusions? Emotional interpretations? Good luck with that. Drivers are logical, technical, and quantitative. They want data and structure. Try to engage them without these things, and they have no qualms voicing their displeasure. Even if you do arrive armed with facts, don’t expect Drivers to accept them at face value. They will likely question your data, dispute your premise, and argue with your conclusion. But often that’s not a bad sign. Drivers are competitive and love to debate. They respect someone that can go toe to toe with them—and they don’t give out points to people who are self-eff acing. Tell a Driver you’re not that good at something and, chances are, they will believe you.

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Guardians value stability and they bring order and rigor

This is the second post in a four-part series about the Business Chemistry types. Read the post first in the series, about Pioneers, and watch out for the upcoming posts about Drivers and Integrators. Subscribe here so you don’t miss them!

If we had to pick one word to represent what the Guardian values, it would be STABILITY. A Guardian knows it’s essential to forge a solid foundation before building anything skyward. And when it comes to how the Guardian does things, many aspects of their working style serve to establish and maintain such stability. They’re methodical, careful, disciplined, meticulous, and exacting. (How else to ensure a foundation is sound?) Guardians believe it’s important to follow a structured process when completing a task, and they like a bit of structure in their work environments and meetings too.

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Slam Dunk Tips for a Productive Team



As we enter the final rounds of this year’s college basketball season, there’s much business leaders can learn from coaches about building collaborative and motivated teams .

”Upsets” happen every day in the sports world; however, it is rare for a team to accomplish something truly unprecedented. Yet, never before had a 16-seed beaten a one-seed in the NCAA Tournament – at least, not until 2018, when the unknown, unheralded UMBC Retrievers took down top-ranked Virginia in one of the most historic upsets in sports history.

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Pioneers value possibilities and spark energy and imagination

*This first post in a four-part series about the Business Chemistry types. Post two, about Guardians, has since been posted as well. Watch out for posts three (about Drivers), and four (about Integrators). Subscribe here so you don’t miss them!

If we could capture the essence of the Pioneer in one word, it would be POSSIBILITIES. Pioneers love imagining what could be and don’t hesitate to reach beyond the status quo. Expressions like “What if…?”, “Picture this…”, “Yes, and…”, and “Why not?” are music to a Pioneer’s ears, and often are lead-ins to lively brainstorms. Pioneers are big fans of collaborative idea generation. They’re very comfortable with ambiguity, and highly adaptable to change—whether they’re the ones initiating it, as is often the case, or not.

Strong Pioneers tend to be easy to spot because they’re typically high energy and outgoing. They’re the ones you can hear all the way down the hallway before you even get to the conference room. Or more likely, you’ll hear them coming down the hallway as you wait in the conference room, because they’ll be running late. They have little regard for rigid structure, and an almost allergic aversion to details. That agenda the team put together so painstakingly? Don’t expect the Pioneers to follow it. Their thinking can be non-linear and resists constraint. That detailed review of the pivot table analysis you had planned? Their eyes will blur and their minds will wander as you strain what paltry patience they possess. But give them a juicy, open-ended challenge and a whiteboard, and they’ll be formidable idea generators.

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Can an introvert be a good leader?

Stereotypes about leadership could be preventing you from seeing the unique strengths and potential of some of your most talented employees.

Do you think of leaders as outgoing, sometimes larger-than-life individuals who command attention? If so, you may have a hard time seeing an introvert as a good leader. And those misconceptions may be stopping you from promoting some of your best and most talented employees.

While some people may view being quiet and reserved as a leadership weaknesses, an introvert’s ability to be a thoughtful listener can help them be successful in strategic roles. 

Learn more about recognizing the unique advantages of introvert leaders and the strengths they offer their organizations in this new article published by Multibriefs “Can an introvert be a good leader?

Yes! You can save a challenging business relationship

Business Chemistry can help you build stronger business relationships.

Executive leaders can build successful teams and maintain productive relationships with business stakeholders by understanding and leveraging cognitive diversity.

The CIO of a global manufacturing company was elbows-deep in a multiyear enterprise resource planning (ERP) transformation when her organization hired its first marketing chief. She enthusiastically made room on her busy calendar to meet with the new CMO, but her interest began to fade when the CMO arrived late to the meeting. As he presented a series of visionary ideas about mobile marketing analytics and AI, the CIO found herself impatiently tapping her foot. “I don’t have time to waste on blue-sky ideas,” she thought, making a mental note to avoid him until after the ERP implementation was complete.

Can this relationship be saved?  Deloitte LLP’s Kim Christfort and Suzanne Vickberg share perspectives on building stronger relationships in a new article published in the Wall Street Journal.

How Understanding The Four Workplace Personalities Can Change Your Office For The Better

ind_ps_glb_ho_2007_lo (1)Tensions in the workplace and conflicting personalities have gotten the best of even the most patient of managers. Conflicting personalities amongst staff members are certainly nothing new, and it’s a problem that usually scales with a company as it grows. Many organizations go through growing pains as new staff are added, but what happens when you organization experiences more cases of disagreements, jealousy, and tension? In the best cases, it makes the break room mildly unpleasant; in the worst, turnover.

Read more about how understanding different work styles can make your office a place where all types can thrive in this article from Forbes.