Engaging Gen Y: 5 tips for CMOs to get the most from millennial talent

Cover ImageThe Wall Street Journal’s CMO Today section has published a new article based on our recent research, “Business Chemistry Reveals the Millennial Mindset.”  In that article they point to five tips that CMOs and other business leaders can use to engage the millennial generation.

“Millennials, the cohort commonly referred to as Generation Me, are most likely to identify with methodical, risk-averse Guardians than with any other type. Given millennials’ reputations for “thinking big” about their career aspirations and impact, this may seem counterintuitive. One possible explanation may be that, early in their careers, millennials were often relied upon—and rewarded for—their attention to detail and ability to follow a structured, methodical approach.”

“Understanding millennials’ work style types is one way that CMOs can engage millennial workers and help strengthen their commitment. In addition, CMOs and other business leaders can consider the following measures to make the most of millennial talent.”

Read the 5 tips for CMOs in today’s article.

CIOs can forge stronger working relationships, tap into team strengths, and help their organizations thrive

wsj_header2-870x276Leading in business today often means moving at a brisk pace, embracing a significant level of risk, and making decisions quickly. It can also require a certain level of adaptability and agility to navigate in uncertain times. Which behavioral types thrive in this kind of environment, and how can CIOs work with other types in the C-suite to drive success for their organizations?  Read the article in the Wall Street Journal’s CIO Corner.

Millennial stereotypes debunked as research confirms they display a full range of personality types

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Workplace Insight, the UK’s most widely read publication dedicated to the design and management of workplaces, has published a new article by Sara Bean based on Deloitte’s Millennial Mindset report.

“With a plethora of reports around that generalise the behaviour of an entire generation of people, yet another exploration of the Millennial has to be approached with caution. But for this latest study, “The Millennial mindset: Work styles and aspirations of the most misunderstood worker”, Deloitte Greenhouse analyses the Business Chemistry types of millennials and (thank goodness) dismisses some of the most common stereotypes.”

Share your thoughts via Twitter with the report’s researchers @selenrezvani and @MonahanK.

 

October 5 webcast announced: Demystifying the millennial mindset

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Register today for our next webcast.  The generation that received its first high school diplomas in 2000 now includes many experienced professionals. Their reputation preceded them into the workforce: Entitled, self-centered. What is the reality? Based on the Deloitte Business Chemistry framework and three original research studies, we’ll discuss:

  • Why millennials are more likely than baby boomers or GenXers to be change-averse as Business Chemistry Guardians
  • The unique stresses this generation brings to, and finds within, professional life
  • The reason they may be “secret introverts” despite their hyper-networked communication habits

Click here to view the report: “The Millennial Mindset: Work styles and aspirations of millennials.”

Think you know millennials? Think again says new Business Chemistry report

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Download the new report and register today for the upcoming webcast on October 5.

Never mind how old millennials are. The idea of them is 30 years old. It was 1987 when William Strauss and Neil Howe hung that name on the people who would start to graduate from high school at the turn of the coming century.

And ever since, we’ve often heard the same stereotypes: They’re self-centered. Entitled. They value passion over performance. Fulfillment over a full day’s work. And they don’t understand why no one has given them a corner office yet. Now that millennials are deep into the workforce, how well do these stereotypes really hold up?

Where folklore falls short, Business Chemistry helps us look deeper. In the course of three online studies, the Deloitte Greenhouse team used a data-driven approach to see how working styles could aid in our understanding of millennials and how to maximize their strengths.

Business Chemistry uses analytics to reveal how each person reflects four scientifically based patterns of behavior: Pioneers, Drivers, Guardians, and Integrators. Knowing which traits emerge more strongly in which people can help drive more rewarding collaboration among people, within teams–and now, even between generations.

Learn how you can make the most of millennial talent.  Download the report and explore more insights: www.deloitte.com/us/MillennialMindset

 

 

Are you too connected? Five Simple Ways to Achieve Better Work-Life Balance

E02KDK_loAs summer comes to a close and families prepare for back-to-school, making work and life balance—while juggling job expectations and career aspirations, helping with homework or school projects, and attending extracurricular activities—can be a challenge. The growing role of technology in our daily lives can add to this struggle, as expectations for employees to always be connected can further blur the lines between work time and personal time.

In a new article published in HR People and Strategy, “5 Simple Ways to Help Your Team (and Self) Achieve Better Work-Life Balance,”  Kim Christfort, national managing director of the Deloitte Greenhouse Experience, says that many business leaders and workers fail to understand that 24-hour connectivity isn’t the best thing for well-being or productivity. Studies show that overworking employees can lead to decreased productivity, and even health issues.

Christfort provides five tips to carve out time for yourself and your family despite a demanding schedule, which may help those Business Chemistry types more prone to experience stress.

Inspired leadership: Four elements effective leaders should master

Confessions_Ep#9_InspiredLeadershipAre leaders born or made?  In this week’s new episode of our Confessions podcast, “Inspired Leadership,” our guest, Steve Schloss, Chief People Officer at the United States Golf Association (USGA), says the answer is… both.

Tune in to hear Steve’s perspective on the qualities that make an effective leader, and the four core leadership disciplines— conscious leadership, connected leadership, informed leadership, and influential leadership—that he believes executives need to master in order to be truly successful.

Business Chemistry’s lead researcher, Suzanne Vicksburg and the Deloitte Greenhouse™ Experience national leader, Kim Christfort will join the conversation to provide their own insights and opinions.

Be sure to keep your ears open for more stories and thoughts from today’s leaders in our next episode, and check out Deloitte’s award-winning Resilience podcast and M&A’s Trends podcast series. Find both on Deloitte.com, Stitcher, or Apple’s podcast app

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types and share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @drsuzbizchem.

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Confession: Talk all you want, but listening is a key leadership skill

teaser_EP#8Download Confessions Episode No. 8: “Flexing for Success” with USGA’s Chief People Officer Steve Schloss

Effective leaders are big, bold, outspoken individuals who inspire confidence and loyalty through the sheer force of their dynamic personalities. Or, are they?

In this week’s episode of Confessions, we talk with Steven Schloss, Chief People Officer of the United States Golf Association, who says that while extroverts may come across as the more obvious leaders, their more reserved colleagues shouldn’t be overlooked.

“I’ve often said to people that if you want applause, you can talk all you want, but if you want results, you have to listen,” said Schloss.

Listen to this week’s episode, “Flexing for Success,” to hear his view on the value of introspection.

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Collaboration is Crucial for Communication Teams

2017-07-17_19-46-42Communications teams come in many different shapes and sizes. Whether a three-person team or a global department, collaboration is essential for getting the most out a team’s constituent parts says Dr. Suzanne Vickberg, lead researcher on the Business Chemistry system, in an interview for Communication Director magazine by Jan Wisniewski.

The article shares insights on how communication leaders can help their teams work alongside each other and collaborate successfully

While only subscribers to the magazine can access the article , non subscribers can learn more about Business Chemistry here.

Building Strong Teams–Confessions Episode 7

teaser_EP#7_2In our previous podcast episode of Confessions, we discussed the importance of smart risk taking with Mark Buthman, CFO Emeritus at Kimberly-Clark Corporation. In that discussion, Mark revealed an interesting fact about himself—he doesn’t possess the normally dominant Business Chemistry® traits of a CFO.

Whereas most CFOs identify as Drivers or Guardians—driven and/or analytical personality types—Mark is an Integrator and team builder. It’s a trait that would help him recognize the value of cognitive diversity within teams.

“One of the risks in finance, and [on] any leadership team—there’s a lot of analytical, decisive leaders around, but that doesn’t make for such diversity,” Buthman said.

Want to learn more about which Business Chemistry type might best describe you? Learn more about the 4 Types or share your thoughts with Dr. Suz on Twitter @DrSuzBizChem.

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